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Foreign travel advice - Japan

Safety and security

Crime
Crime levels are low. It is generally safe to walk about at night and to travel on public transport, but you should maintain the same level of vigilance as you would at home and take sensible precautions.

Crime

Reports of inappropriate touching or ‘chikan’ of female passengers on commuter trains are fairly common. The police advise that you shout at the perpetrator to attract attention and ask a fellow passenger to call the train staff.

The Roppongi entertainment district of Tokyo is considered a higher risk area for crime. British nationals have been arrested following disputes with bar staff and doormen. There have also been reports of drink spiking with drugs like Rohypnol. Victims have described loss of consciousness for several hours, during which time large amounts have been fraudulently billed to their credit card.
If your passport is lost or stolen, you should report this at a police station and get a police report.

Emergency services
In cases of emergency, dial 110 for the police and 119 for the fire or ambulance services.  Calls are free of charge from any phone, including pay phones.

Emergency services

Fukushima
Based on guidance from UK Government scientists, the FCO advise against all travel to the exclusion zones around the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant identified by the Japanese authorities. These exclusion zones are kept under review. Even areas where evacuation orders are ready to be lifted (marked green on the map) are still subject to some restrictions - for instance visitors are not allowed to stay overnight.

Fukushima

The exclusion zone around the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant has been designated a restricted area. Anyone entering this area illegally is liable to a fine of up to 100,000 yen (£589) or detention.

The Japanese authorities are carrying out comprehensive checks to monitor radiation in the area surrounding Fukushima and to monitor possible contamination of water, and food and produce. They impose strict controls where necessary. There continue to be reports about leaks of contaminated water. These reports are being monitored by UK government scientists. Any significant change in the current situation will be reported on this page.

Although the situation at Fukushima will remain of concern for some time, the risks are gradually declining.

Road travel
To drive in Japan, you must hold an International Driving Permit (IDP), a current UK licence and insurance. An IDP is only valid for use in Japan for one year regardless of its date of expiry. Check the Tokyo Metropolitan Police Department website for further details. You must carry your driving license with you at all times. Penalties for driving in Japan without the correct documents are severe.

Road travel

If you intend to stay in Japan for longer than one year, you should apply for a Japanese driving licence. For more information and details of offices where you can apply for a Japanese licence, visit the Japanese Automobile Federation website.      

There are two types of driving insurance available in Japan:

Compulsory insurance (jibaisekihoken) and voluntary insurance (nin’i no jidoshahoken). The compulsory insurance on its own may be insufficient in cases of personal liability.

Roads are well maintained. Driving is on the left, as in the UK. Road rules are mostly the same as in the UK, but drivers should pay particular attention to: pedestrians crossing roads at green lights, especially at junctions; cyclists travelling on the pavements or on the wrong side of the road and without lights at night; and taxi drivers stopping suddenly.

There are severe penalties to deter drink driving, including allowing someone else to drink and drive (for example if you are a passenger in a vehicle being driven by a drunk driver). Offences can attract a heavy fine or imprisonment.

In 2012 there were 5,237 road deaths in Japan (source Dft). This equates to 4.1 road deaths per 100,000 of population and compares to the UK average of 3.0 road deaths per 100,000 of population in 2012.

Political situation
Japan is a stable democracy. Civil disturbances and violent demonstrations are rare. Occasionally, demonstrations of a pro-nationalist kind can involve hostility to foreign countries. Keep yourself informed of developments and if you become aware of any protests, leave the area immediately.

Political situation

Mobile phone networks
Only 3G and 4G capable UK handsets will work in Japan. GSM-only UK phones don’t work, as there’s no GSM network. If you plan to make lots of calls or use mobile data in Japan, SIM cards are available to hire online or in-store. WiFi zones are also increasingly available in coffee shops, hotels and other public spaces.

Mobile phone networks


Foreign Travel Advice by The Harver Group - Your Health Insurance Counter Fraud Services Tokyo

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